Mark Ronson, the late Amy Winehouse’s producer and friend, honored the singer at his wedding in Aix de Provence, France.  Ronson married French model Josephine De La Baume.  The producer, 35 and Baume, 26 tied the knot after planning their two-day wedding affair in just six months.  Shortly after Amy Winehouse, 27 was found dead in her London home on July 23rd, Ronson took to Twitter to express his grief, “This is one of the saddest days of my life.”  A source told UsMagazine.com, “Amy was a great friend of both Mark and Josephine and they would have been thrilled to have her with them at their big day, but sadly it wasn’t to be.”  The bride and groom found a way to turn their feelings of grief into feelings of gratitude toward Winehouse on the happiest day of their lives with a memorable toast.

What are some ways to remember deceased loved ones at your wedding?

Cupid’s Advice:

If you have a family member or friend who has passed away that you want to honor at your wedding (without tissue boxes and running mascara), find a way to incorporate the individual into the nuptials without ruining the joyous mood:

1. Favorite song: If your loved one had a song he or she enjoyed, have the DJ dedicate the tune to that person, and get the crowd up and moving.  Think “YMCA” or “The Electric Slide.”

2. Memorabilia: Something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue.  Carry an item that belonged to the person who’s no longer with you in your bouquet (a picture or jewelry, for example).

3. Wedding program: When you watch a movie or read a book, there’s often closing credits that read, “In Loving Memory.”  Well, “In Loving Memory” can be the first words in your ceremony program dedicated to your loved one.  Just remember to keep it simple and meaningful.

Have you ever been a guest at a wedding that turned sour because of a memorial to a deceased loved one?  Share your experience below.